Mayor Brown's Transformation

From political pundit to party outcast, former Progressive Conservative leader and MPP Patrick Brown, author of Takedown: The Attempted Political Assassination of Patrick Brown, shares the triumphs and challenges of his life in politics.

Politics has been a part of Patrick Brown’s DNA from the time he was nine years old. His parents, Judy and Edmond, nurtured this interest in their young son by encouraging him to read a variety of daily newspapers and discuss what he’d read around the dinner table. It was this unbridled passion and genuine interest to serve for the public good that would at first pole-vault Brown to great heights of electoral success, before almost destroying him on both a personal and a professional level. This hit-by-a-truck fall from grace prompted Brown to write Takedown: The Attempted Political Assassination of Patrick Brown

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Optimum Retains Counsel

After a number of consultations Optimum has retained counsel to defend the recent claim brought forward by Finance Minister Vic Fedeli. We will seek to defend the book and it’s content as well as our right to address questions arising from the book.

LILLEY: Looking back at year following Patrick Brown's fall from grace

I have to wonder which policies the lefty activists would be protesting now had Patrick Brown not been taken out as Progressive Conservative leader a year ago.

Brown had established that he would run a moderate campaign, a less than conservative campaign, for the PC’s in the 2018 election. He endorsed a carbon tax, called for a huge investment in health CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE

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Press Release: Bad Blood The Unspeakable Truth

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/optimum-releases-bad-blood-the-unspeakable-truth-by-vic-parsons-845062182.html

Click above for CNW Press Release

Optimum releases Bad Blood, The Unspeakable Truth, by Vic Parsons

NEWS PROVIDED BY

Optimum Publishing International 

Jan 15, 2019, 10:10 ET

TORONTO, Jan. 15, 2019 /CNW/ - Optimum Publishing International is pleased to announce the release of Bad Blood: The Unspeakable Truth, the revised and updated book on the Canadian tainted blood crisis of the '80s and '90s.

None of us knows when we, or a loved one, might need blood. We all have a stake in a safe blood system. Although Canada's blood system today is immeasurably more reliable than it was in the 1980s and 1990s, we need to remain vigilant against any threats to safety.

A recent Canadian Blood Services poll showed 61 percent of respondents have little or no knowledge of the tainted blood disaster of the '80s and '90s when money and expediency were put ahead of the health of those who depended on a safe blood and plasma supply.

On Wednesday, January 9th CBC aired the first episode of their 8 part docudrama, Unspeakable, based on the original book by Vic Parsons, Bad Blood: The Tragedy of the Canadian Tainted Blood Scandal.

https://www.cbc.ca/unspeakable/

"This is why I am pleased to be associated with the Unspeakable series on CBC, produced by Robert Cooper," said Parsons.  Cooper had this to say about the book, "Unspeakable, the television series, would not have been the same without Vic's detailed, compassionate and personal account of the tainted blood tragedy.  If you want to know what really happened, how it affected people and the impact it still has today, read this book."

In the new book, we update the story and tell the final chapter of many of the victims that were infected with HIV and Hepatitis C. Vic is an award-winning journalist who was directly affected by the crisis as his son battled with HIV and Hep C but remarkably he is one of the few survivors and lives with his family in Vancouver. "This is why I am proud that Bad Blood: The Unspeakable Truth, the new and revised version of my earlier book, can contribute to raising public awareness," said Parsons.

"One of our key goals for the new book is to provide readers with new insight and recent developments in the managing of blood, particularly the new controversy surrounding paid plasma," said Dean Baxendale publisher.

"Corporations are compelled to minimize the cost of goods produced to maximize returns to their shareholders," said Andrew Cumming, a severe hemophiliac before the Ontario legislative committee in December 2014. That controversy is being played out in every province and our parliament in Ottawa this year.

While Canadian Blood Services was incorporated and formed after the blood crisis, as a result of incompetence and liability, they have played a pivotal role in safeguarding our blood supply.  However, in a hauntingly similar nod to the past, the Agency, in reaction to the TV series, released a statement that paints a rosy picture claiming that this can never happen again. Officials entrusted to safeguard our blood supply were responsible for thousands of deaths here in Canada and around the Globe, and that is why the public needs to be reminded of the tragedy of the past so that the public can hold those responsible to account for their actions. Time will tell.

https://blood.ca/en/news-and-events/newsroom/op-ed

Blood, the Gift of Life? In God we Trust

To see the trailer for the series on the most extensive government malfeasance ever, Click Below.

https://youtu.be/jXYjUTdPEVo/youtu

www.opibooks.com

SOURCE Optimum Publishing International

For further information: To interview Vic Parson's, or to receive an electronic review copy, please contact publicity@optimumpublishinginternational.com or call 647 970-1973

From The Queen's Park side of the coin

FOR THE RECORD

ONTARIO LEGISLATIVE HIGHLIGHTS

WEEKLY ROUNDUP

EVERY TRICK IN THE BOOK – Political memoirs, at least the Canadian variety, tend to be pretty tame, but former PC Leader Patrick Brown’s new book is causing quite a stir. Take Down: The Attempted Political Assassination of Patrick Brown – a revised title, “Attempted” being added when his political career was resuscitated by winning the Brampton mayoralty – has many of his former colleagues scrambling to discredit his version of the events that led to his provincial downfall. Relations between Brown and his successor, Premier Doug Ford, were already frosty, and now figure to get downright arctic. Ditto for current cabinet ministers trashed in the book. Lisa MacLeod, for instance, initially declined to offer an opinion, scoffing, “I don’t comment on fiction.” But when she saw how Brown depicted her, particularly her mental health struggles (which she has been quite public about), she blasted his writing as “disgusting and cruel.”

“His was the biggest betrayal because I always thought I treated him well. I recall that Fedeli sucked up to me non-stop with compliments like ‘you’re the best leader we ever had’ and … ‘you inspire me.’ He’d lay it on thick; it was over the top at times. My experience with Fedeli was that he was extremely competent, but that he was also duplicitous and too ambitious for his own good.”

·          Excerpt from former PC Leader Patrick Brown’s new book, which is less than complimentary about many of his former colleagues, including the current Finance Minister. Brown’s memoir also tells of sexual harassment allegations against Fedeli in 2017 (never pursued, due to lack of evidence). Fedeli vehemently denies any such claim, and told reporters he is considering legal action against Brown. In a show of support, almost everyone in the PC caucus wore a yellow tie – Fedeli’s trademark apparel – in the House.

“I would rather have the endorsement of Kathleen Wynne than Patrick Brown. The lies in this book are disgusting.”

·          Premier Ford’s book review.

“It’s hard to watch, that’s for sure. It’s really hard to watch. I don’t like watching what are, in my opinion, bad decisions. I don’t like that at all, and it worries me enormously.”

Former Premier Wynne, in a Globe and Mail feature on what it’s like to sit in the Legislature while the government rapidly undoes many of her policies.  Asked which policy is toughest to see go, she answered (‘dryly,’ according to the Globe), “It’s hard to choose.”

Bad Blood The Unspeakable Truth

Did Bill Clinton play a role in the tainted Blood Crisis?

CLINTON & THE KILLER BLOOD

In the mid-1980s, as contaminated blood flowed from Arkansas inmates to other countries, then-Governor W.J. Clinton sat on his hands despite evidence of severe mismanagement in his prison system and its medical operations. The prison medical program was being run by Health Management Associates, which was headed by Leonard Dunn, a man who would brag to state police of his close ties to Clinton.

Some of the killer blood ended up in Canada where it contributed to the deaths of an unknown number of blood and plasma recipients. An estimated 2,000 Canadian recipients of blood and related products got the AIDS virus between 1980 and 1985. At least 10,000 Canadians were infected with the hepatitis C virus between 1980 and 1990. Arkansas was one of the few sources of bad blood during this period.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police has a staff of 24 working on the case. Investigators interviewed about 600 people from multiple countries including the U.S., Germany and the Netherlands. They had more than 30,000 documents according to the Ottawa Citizen,

State Prisons who were involved with the collection of plasma had it shipped to Switzerland, Spain, Japan, and Italy. In a case with strong echoes of the Arkansas scandal, a former premier of France and two of his cabinet colleagues were put on trial stemming from the wrongful handling of blood supplies. Some of the blood in the French controversy may have come from Arkansas.

A 1992 Newsday report on the French scandal noted that three persons had been convicted for their role in distributing blood they knew was contaminated: "Throughout the 1980s and later, blood was taken from prison donors for use in blood banks despite a series of directives warning against such a practice. According to the report, donations from prisoners accounted for 25 percent of all the contaminated blood products in France. Blood from prisons was 69 times more contaminated that that of the general population of donors."

The Arkansas blood program was also grossly mishandled by the Food and Drug Administration. And the scandal provides yet another insight into how the American media misled the public about Clinton during the 1992 campaign. The media ignored a major Clinton scandal despite, for example, 80 articles about it in the Arkansas Democrat in just one four-month period of the mid-80s.

Here's how Canada's Krever Commissioner report describes the beginnings of the problem:

"During 1981-2, the number of AIDS cases in the United States reported to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta grew at an alarming rate. The vast majority of the reported cases were of homosexual men and intravenous drug abusers. During 1982, cases of AIDS transmitted through the use of blood and blood products began to be reported.

The U.S. blood and plasma centers regularly collected from two groups of persons who were at high risk of contracting AIDS: homosexual men and prison inmates. Plasma was collected at centers, licensed by the Food and Drug Administration, in prisons in Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. By way of contrast, because of the high prevalence of hepatitis B in prisons, the Canadian Red Cross Society had stopped collecting donations from prison inmates in 1971."

Suzi Parker, writing in the Arkansas Times, described the scene: "At the Cummins Unit of the Arkansas penal system during the 1980s, while President Clinton was still governor, inmates would regularly cross the prison hospital's threshold to give blood, lured by the prospect of receiving $7 a pint. The ritual was creepy to behold: Platoons of prisoners lying supine on rows of cots, waiting for the needle-wielding prisoner orderly to puncture a vein and watch the clear bags fill with blood. Administrators than sold the blood to brokers, who in turned shipped it to other sates and to Japan, Italy, Spain and Canada. Despite repeated warnings from the Food and Drug Administration, Arkansas kept its prison plasma program running until 1994 when it became the very last state to cease selling its prisoners' plasma.

Mike Galster, a medical practitioner whose fictionalized account dramatically raised interest in the blood scandal, recalls that at the Pine Bluff unit's hospital they also took blood from prisoners. When he raised questions about the wisdom of bleeding sick people, he was told that even the ill had the right to sell their blood.

For more on the biggest public health crisis in Canada buy your copy today of Bad Blood, The Unspeakable Truth. Don’t become complacent and let it happen again.

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